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2023, culture, edgy -

Was Columbus a  conqueror or a discoverer

It really depends on who you ask whether Christopher Columbus is seen as a conqueror or discoverer, with many split on ideological lines.

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Bees play a big role in agriculture. They pollinate crops, increase yields, and give rise to a lucrative honey industry. Bees are so important, in fact, that millions are spent renting hives to pollinate farmers’ crops.   Over one third of the food we eat relies on pollination by bees, either directly or indirectly. Many fruits, nuts, and vegetables require pollination by bees and other insects in order to yield fruit, and without pollinators these crops could all but disappear from grocery store shelves.   All of this pollination adds up to a big price tag: Honey bees contribute $24...

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Our body contains two types of cannabinoid receptors—CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are found in the nervous system and brain, while CB2 receptors are located in the immune system and other areas of the body. CBG works by binding to both receptors where it’s thought to strengthen the function of anandamide, a neurotransmitter that plays a role in enhancing pleasure and motivation, regulating appetite and sleep, and alleviating pain. Unlike THC, CBG has no psychotropic effects, so it will not give you a high.   CBG has been shown to boost energy, heighten focus, and promote a slew of other...

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While you may not have heard about CBG, humans have reaped its benefits for millennia, in both cannabis and hemp plants. It was first synthesized in 1964, alongside THC, and has been studied extensively for its medicinal potential. It’s often called the “mother of all cannabinoids” because without it, cannabis would have no high. Thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp plants that contain less than 0.3% THC are federally legal. CBGA is present in both cannabis and hemp plants, and since it directly correlates to hemp plants’ CBG and CBD potency, farmers can derive CBG from hemp plants. In...

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Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula.  By the 15th century, coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. Coffee was not only enjoyed in homes, but also in the many public coffee houses — called qahveh khaneh — which began to appear in cities across the Near East. The popularity of the coffee houses was unequaled and people frequented them for all kinds of social activity.  Not only did the patrons drink coffee and engage in conversation, but they also listened to music,...

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